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 Core DSP tutorial image

Ed.: I’ve been wanting to take advantage of Reaktor’s Core DSP engine for some time — allowing you to get your hands dirty with hard-core DSP work — but I have to admit, I wasn’t even sure to start. So this gives me some serious geeky satisfaction. Normally, the point is that I’m supposed to be teaching this stuff, but I may have to blog my progress through the Core DSP stuff. Anyone with me? -PK

Reaktor users are always hungry for news and instructional material regarding their favorite weapon, and NI head honcho Stephan Schmitt has come through with two DSP tutorials by Vadim Zavalishin, creator of the Core DSP engine that was introduced in Reaktor 5.

This is not for the faint of heart. According to Stephan:

The articles are in a very condensed scientific style. They definitely require some academic education and DSP knowledge. They are accompanied by two tutorials helping you to implement and to try out the discussed methods in Reaktor Core. Those who dive into this material will be rewarded by some deep insights into the design of filters.

If you’re up to it, the DSP articles are available on the NI site: http://www.native-instruments.com/index.php?id=dsparticles&L=1

At the very least, I’d recommend a refresher read of the excellent Core tutorial that shipped with Reaktor 5 before tackling Vadim’s articles: http://www.native-instruments.com/fileadmin/redaktion_upload/pdf/NI_REAKTOR5_Core_Manual_EN.pdf

Remember, drink plenty of fluids and do not operate heavy equipment while studying DSP.

12 Responses

  1. Mike

    Wow, this is way over my head. I’m still struggling to work out what half the ready-built modules do. I’ve been trying to learn by deconstructing simple ensembles like noise gates and figuring out what each module does to the signal, but frankly I’m even finding that hard work – and I’m no idiot.

  2. Peter Kirn

    @Mike: don’t worry, you’re not alone. I’m going to actually work on seeing if we can’t distill a little bit For The Rest of Us … and meanwhile, our interest in Reaktor remains primarily on the higher-level stuff (stay tuned for more on that).

  3. 4lefts

    wow! thanks for sharing those but… whoa. the .pdf equivalent of running with scissors. it VERY good to see that the head honchos of NI are on board though, and willing to share. very encouraging.

    “our interest in Reaktor remains primarily on the higher-level stuff (stay tuned for more on that)”

    very good to know – and i will. it’s been said before, but reaktor really is crying out for a unified set of mid-level tutorials (yes, like max’s). stuff for people who read the “my first synth” stuff in the reaktor manual and thought it was too basic, but have no hope of being able to make “newscool” or “sinebeats” by themselves, nor, more importantly, be able to see a clear path to getting to a level of ability that would allow them to do that. it’s the lack of this kind of stuff that means reaktor has a daily fight against getting dumped from my dock.

    that said, does anyone else think the reaktor paradigm of patching left to right rather than top to bottom (like max, etc) makes more sense given the shape of a computer screen?

  4. Peter Dines

    Hi 4lefts, I agree that it’s an encouraging sign from NI but yes, there should be more mid level instructional material, especially dealing with sequencing, event handling and branching. That’s what I’m going to be covering in a screencast here soon.

    Interesting point about patching direction. I definitely take advantage of the wide screen on my computer to lay out Reaktor structures… it’s a good idea to encapsulate things in macros, though, to clarify structure and to be kind to people with lower screen resolution.

  5. 4lefts

    thanks peter d. i’ll keep my eyes peeled. i like your blog by the way – the granular stuff and the clock tutorial were very useful. cheers.

  6. Peter Dines

    Ah, you’ve already seen that? Good. I was about to link up Noisepages readers who haven’t seen it with the clock tutorial, which is a good first step for what I’m covering next.

    BTW, my blogspot page is going to be a little quiet for now, so check back here for more Reaktory goodness.

  7. Mike

    4lefts has hit the nail on the head. I’ve gone through the bundled tutorial, built some basic subtractive synths using the existing macro’s. But I have idea’s that I would like to build, some that I thought would be easy, but frankly, I just can’t get my head around it yet.

  8. [...] a previous post, I linked you up with a Native Instruments tutorial on DSP in the Core level of Reaktor 5. Ed.: [...]

  9. dsp

    dsp…

    In other cases government policies have been introduced to encourage the switch-over process, especially with regard to terrestrial broadcasts….

  10. TCero
  11. [...] What NI has that its rivals don’t is the person who authored that book. (Ahem. In fact, for anyone complaining about Reaktor upgrades, my question for you is, have you mastered Core yet? DSP science? No? Then you should make your own five-year plan wrapping your head around Vadim’s extensive DSP tutorials.) [...]

  12. [...] What NI has that its rivals don’t is the person who authored that book. (Ahem. In fact, for anyone complaining about Reaktor upgrades, my question for you is, have you mastered Core yet? DSP science? No? Then you should make your own five-year plan wrapping your head around Vadim’s extensive DSP tutorials.) [...]

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